Around the World with TAC: We’re continuing our digital voyage across the globe this week with “Tigranakert: An Armenian Odyssey.” This video documents the discovery of an ancient Armenian city built by Tigran the Great in the First Century BC. This was meant to be the new, centralized capital of the Armenian Empire, which was, for a time, the most powerful state east of the Roman Empire: http://bit.ly/1l9Z1eo

Around the World with TAC: We’re continuing our digital voyage across the globe this week with “Tigranakert: An Armenian Odyssey.” This video documents the discovery of an ancient Armenian city built by Tigran the Great in the First Century BC. This was meant to be the new, centralized capital of the Armenian Empire, which was, for a time, the most powerful state east of the Roman Empire: http://bit.ly/1l9Z1eo

Check out the latest audio news from archaeologica! This week’s episode features the following headlines:
Copper awl in northern Israel earliest evidence of Middle Eastern metalworking
New study shows different evidence of violence and peace for the Ancestral Puebloans
New archaeological evidence challenges the origins of Zoroastrianism
Cultural diversity for early modern humans occurred in Africa

Listen to the audio news RIGHT HERE!
Image courtesy of The Jerusalem Post | JPost.com: http://bit.ly/1qHNY8D

Check out the latest audio news from archaeologica! This week’s episode features the following headlines:

  • Copper awl in northern Israel earliest evidence of Middle Eastern metalworking
  • New study shows different evidence of violence and peace for the Ancestral Puebloans
  • New archaeological evidence challenges the origins of Zoroastrianism
  • Cultural diversity for early modern humans occurred in Africa

Listen to the audio news RIGHT HERE!

Image courtesy of The Jerusalem Post | JPost.comhttp://bit.ly/1qHNY8D

We added another new video to the TAC website yesterday! “Galilee Cemetery: Beauty in a Forgotten Space” explores the Galilee Cemetery which dates back to Sarasota’s early days. After many years of neglect, the Galilee Cemetery Task Force organized a clean-up campaign, created a more appealing entrance and recruited New College of Florida Professor Dr. Uzi Baram to document the lives of the interred. In February of 2010, Dr. Baram assembled anthropology students from New College of Florida and State College of Florida to assist members of the Task Force in a project that will systematically record the location of as many graves as possible: http://bit.ly/1t7vVij

We added another new video to the TAC website yesterday! “Galilee Cemetery: Beauty in a Forgotten Space” explores the Galilee Cemetery which dates back to Sarasota’s early days. After many years of neglect, the Galilee Cemetery Task Force organized a clean-up campaign, created a more appealing entrance and recruited New College of Florida Professor Dr. Uzi Baram to document the lives of the interred. In February of 2010, Dr. Baram assembled anthropology students from New College of Florida and State College of Florida to assist members of the Task Force in a project that will systematically record the location of as many graves as possible: http://bit.ly/1t7vVij

Today is the last day before an all new audio news from archaeologica! This week’s episode features the following headlines:
Early Japanese tomb reveals unusual stepped pyramid construction
Interdisciplinary research rewrites history of early Egyptian embalming
New Greek tomb may hold associate of Alexander the Great
New Maya finds include two entire cities buried by jungle

Listen to the audio news RIGHT HERE!
Image courtesy of Discovery News

Today is the last day before an all new audio news from archaeologica! This week’s episode features the following headlines:

  • Early Japanese tomb reveals unusual stepped pyramid construction
  • Interdisciplinary research rewrites history of early Egyptian embalming
  • New Greek tomb may hold associate of Alexander the Great
  • New Maya finds include two entire cities buried by jungle

Listen to the audio news RIGHT HERE!

Image courtesy of Discovery News

Did you know that potholes have been annoying drivers since the time of the Roman empire? Archaeologists have discovered the remnants of a Roman-made road outside of Exeter, UK which exhibits deep wheel ruts and several repaired potholes. A rough road could cause a cart to get stuck or lose a wheel, so potholes were fixed by packing them full of tight-fitting stones. The signs of heavy traffic and regular maintenance suggests this was an important and often-travelled path. Check out the full story here, courtesy of Discovery News.

Did you know that potholes have been annoying drivers since the time of the Roman empire? Archaeologists have discovered the remnants of a Roman-made road outside of Exeter, UK which exhibits deep wheel ruts and several repaired potholes. A rough road could cause a cart to get stuck or lose a wheel, so potholes were fixed by packing them full of tight-fitting stones. The signs of heavy traffic and regular maintenance suggests this was an important and often-travelled path. Check out the full story here, courtesy of Discovery News.

Have you been to the all new TAC Marketplace yet? An extension of The Archaeology Channel, TAC Marketplace allows you to explore and purchase a wide variety of cultural heritage themed books and DVDs from around the world, including videos from TAC’s website! So if you have a favorite archaeological book or a video you’ve viewed on our website, check out TAC Marketplace and order it today!
To shop, CLICK HERE!

Have you been to the all new TAC Marketplace yet? An extension of The Archaeology Channel, TAC Marketplace allows you to explore and purchase a wide variety of cultural heritage themed books and DVDs from around the world, including videos from TAC’s website! So if you have a favorite archaeological book or a video you’ve viewed on our website, check out TAC Marketplace and order it today!

To shop, CLICK HERE!

This week’s TAC Term of the Week was CROPMARK. A CROPMARK is an archaeological site no longer visible from the ground due to plant overgrowth or farm plowing. These sites are usually more visible via aerial photography, where archaeologists can see differences in crop growth over underlying walls or pits. To learn more about cropmarks, check out this article from Wikipedia: http://bit.ly/1pfITrO

This week’s TAC Term of the Week was CROPMARK. A CROPMARK is an archaeological site no longer visible from the ground due to plant overgrowth or farm plowing. These sites are usually more visible via aerial photography, where archaeologists can see differences in crop growth over underlying walls or pits. To learn more about cropmarks, check out this article from Wikipediahttp://bit.ly/1pfITrO

We received news that our film “Guam: The Ocean Oasis” has been selected for screening at the XIV International Archaeological Film Festival of the Bidasoa that will be held in Irun (Spain), between 17th and 22nd of November 2014! This is the third festival “Guam: The Ocean Oasis” has been selected for!

To watch the film, in the February Video News from TAC, CLICK HERE!

And to learn more about our in-house production services and the production process behind this film and others, GO HERE!